Diabetes Test Basic

Diabetes Test Basic

Home-To-Lab

Dried Blood Spot (DBS)

HbA1c

None

This home-to-lab test measures HbA1c, or glycated hemoglobin, which is a measure of average blood glucose levels over the past 2-3 months, used as a marker for long-term glucose control in individuals with type 2 diabetes. It reflects the extent of glucose binding to hemoglobin in red blood cells, providing insight into overall glycemic management and risk of diabetes-related complications.

Higher HbA1c levels indicate poorer blood sugar management, increasing the risk of diabetes-related complications such as heart disease, kidney damage, and neuropathy. Regular HbA1c testing helps patients and healthcare providers adjust treatment plans to achieve better glucose control and improve overall health.

Key Indicators Reported: HbA1c, eAG

700.00

Category:

Only customers holding Indian debit or credit cards may place their order through this portal. International customers are requested to write to us at info@lipomic.com so that we may assist them in placing the order.

General FAQs

Home-to-lab testing allows individuals to collect samples comfortably at home. The main advantages of home sampling include convenience, privacy, and accessibility, as individuals can perform the tests at their own convenience.

Once the sample is collected, it is sent to our laboratory for analysis from anywhere in the world. You will be notified on your registered email once the results are ready, and can be downloaded from your registered account.

DBS testing is no more painful than a self-prick for a glucometer test. The kit contains one-time-use safety lancets which are used for pricking a finger and depositing a sample on a special filter paper card. The blood spot deposited on the filter paper card is allowed to dry, and hence the name dried blood spot.

Similarly, some tests may require saliva, urine or stool samples, which can also be collected on special filter paper cards. This makes the sample collection completely non-invasive.

Watching the instructional video and carefully reading the instruction manual before conducting the test should ensure a smooth experience. Should you encounter any difficulties, please do not hesitate to contact us for assistance.

Once we receive your sample, the average response time is 7-10 business days to receive the results.

Lipomic LifeSciences can provide evidence-based suggestions for lifestyle changes that you can make to positively impact your health. We can also connect you with leading medical experts who can guide and discuss potential next steps.


Test Specific FAQs

You can take this test any time of the day.

Diabetes mellitus is characterized by persistent hyperglycemia and is the most prominent disease related to failure of blood sugar regulation. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose nter your cells in order to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells. Over
time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems.

Hemoglobin (Hb) is the predominant protein found in red blood cells. It gives blood its red color, and its main function is to carry oxygen throughout the body. As glucose builds up in the blood, it binds to the hemoglobin in the red blood cells. The HbA1c test measures the amount of hemoglobin with attached glucose. An HbA1c result of 6.5% implies that HbA1c accounts for 6.5% of the total hemoglobin in your blood. Red blood cells are produced continuously in our body and live for about 120 days. The level of HbA1c at any time is contributed by all circulating RBCs, from the oldest (120 days) to the youngest.

HbA1c and the simple blood glucose measurement are principally different. However, in order to help interpreting results, it possible to convert % HbA1c to average blood glucose values, eAG, as eAG is reported in the same unit as blood sugar measurements (mg/dl).

It should be emphasized that eAG is not the same as the average of day-to-day blood sugar tests obtained using a glucometer. Instead, it should be interpreted as an estimated average of the blood sugar over a period of 3 to 4 months. The table provides an overview of relationship between HbA1c reported in various units and eAG.

While HbA1C or eAG values are significant for long-term diabetes management, they cannot replace daily blood glucose tests. Neither measure reflects current blood sugar levels, essential for adjusting insulin doses, food intake, and activity level. For individuals with diabetes, regular measurement of both HbA1c and daily blood glucose levels is necessary to obtain a comprehensive picture of the overall diabetes management.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended an HbA1c of 6.5% as the cut-point for diagnosing diabetes. A normal HbA1c level is below 5.7%, a level between 5.7% and 6.4% indicates prediabetes, and a level of 6.5% or more indicates diabetes. The goal for most people with diabetes is an HbA1c level of 7% or less.

People with diabetes should have an HbA1c test every 3 months to make sure that the blood sugar is in the target range.

If you have any of the following diabetes symptoms, you should get your HbA1c levels tested.

  • Urinate (pee) a lot, often at night
  • Excessive thirst
  • Weight loss
  • Frequent hunger
  • Blurry vision
  • Numb or tingling hands or feet
  • Fatigue
  • Delayed Healing
  • Prone to infections

Any process that affects the life span of red blood cells will lead to an inaccurate HbA1c reading. Iron deficiency anemia, for example, and small bleeds such as those from ulcers can cause a falsely elevated HbA1c. Patients with kidney disease are subject to anemia and this needs to be taken into consideration when analyzing blood tests.

Conversely, any conditions that may cause red blood cells to decrease their lifecycle, such as hemolysis, can lead to a falsely low HbA1c. Hemolysis causes the production of immature red blood cells with a different lifecycle.

During the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, from week 13 onwards, HbA1c should not be used for assessing blood glucose control.

Sample Report


Diabetes Test Basic

Download Report

General FAQs

Home-to-lab testing allows individuals to collect samples comfortably at home. The main advantages of home sampling include convenience, privacy, and accessibility, as individuals can perform the tests at their own convenience.

Once the sample is collected, it is sent to our laboratory for analysis from anywhere in the world. You will be notified on your registered email once the results are ready, and can be downloaded from your registered account.

DBS testing is no more painful than a self-prick for a glucometer test. The kit contains one-time-use safety lancets which are used for pricking a finger and depositing a sample on a special filter paper card. The blood spot deposited on the filter paper card is allowed to dry, and hence the name dried blood spot.

Similarly, some tests may require saliva, urine or stool samples, which can also be collected on special filter paper cards. This makes the sample collection completely non-invasive.

Watching the instructional video and carefully reading the instruction manual before conducting the test should ensure a smooth experience. Should you encounter any difficulties, please do not hesitate to contact us for assistance.

Once we receive your sample, the average response time is 7-10 business days to receive the results.

Lipomic LifeSciences can provide evidence-based suggestions for lifestyle changes that you can make to positively impact your health. We can also connect you with leading medical experts who can guide and discuss potential next steps.


Test Specific FAQs

You can take this test any time of the day.

Diabetes mellitus is characterized by persistent hyperglycemia and is the most prominent disease related to failure of blood sugar regulation. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose nter your cells in order to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems.

Hemoglobin (Hb) is the predominant protein found in red blood cells. It gives blood its red color, and its main function is to carry oxygen throughout the body. As glucose builds up in the blood, it binds to the hemoglobin in the red blood cells. The HbA1c test measures the amount of hemoglobin with attached glucose. An HbA1c result of 6.5% implies that HbA1c accounts for 6.5% of the total hemoglobin in your blood. Red blood cells are produced continuously in our body and live for about 120 days. The level of HbA1c at any time is contributed by all circulating RBCs, from the oldest (120 days) to the youngest.

HbA1c and the simple blood glucose measurement are
principally different. However, in order to help interpreting
results, it possible to convert % HbA1c to average blood
glucose values, eAG, as eAG is reported in the same unit as
blood sugar measurements (mg/dl).

It should be emphasized that eAG is not the same as the
average of day-to-day blood sugar tests obtained using a
glucometer. Instead, it should be interpreted as an
estimated average of the blood sugar over a period of 3 to 4
months. The table provides an overview of relationship
between HbA1c reported in various units and eAG.

While HbA1C or eAG values are significant for long-term
diabetes management, they cannot replace daily blood
glucose tests. Neither measure reflects current blood sugar
levels, essential for adjusting insulin doses, food intake, and
activity level. For individuals with diabetes, regular
measurement of both HbA1c and daily blood glucose levels
is necessary to obtain a comprehensive picture of the overall
diabetes management.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended an HbA1c of 6.5% as the cut-point for diagnosing diabetes. A normal HbA1c level is below 5.7%, a level between 5.7% and 6.4% indicates prediabetes, and a level of 6.5% or more indicates diabetes. The goal for most people with diabetes is an HbA1c level of 7% or less.

People with diabetes should have an HbA1c test every 3 months to make sure that the blood sugar is in the target range.

If you have any of the following diabetes symptoms, you should get your HbA1c levels tested.

  • Urinate (pee) a lot, often at night
  • Excessive thirst
  • Weight loss
  • Frequent hunger
  • Blurry vision
  • Numb or tingling hands or feet
  • Fatigue
  • Delayed Healing
  • Prone to infections

Any process that affects the life span of red blood cells will lead to an inaccurate HbA1c reading. Iron deficiency anemia, for example, and small bleeds such as those from ulcers can cause a falsely elevated HbA1c. Patients with kidney disease are subject to anemia and this needs to be taken into consideration when analyzing blood tests.

Conversely, any conditions that may cause red blood cells to decrease their lifecycle, such as hemolysis, can lead to a falsely low HbA1c. Hemolysis causes the production of immature red blood cells with a different lifecycle.

During the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, from week 13 onwards, HbA1c should not be used for assessing blood glucose control.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Sample Report


Diabetes Test Basic

Download Report

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